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Offaly (King's) Historical events
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Annual Report 1920

Annual report addressed to the 11th Baron Digby following the death of his predecessor. Goodbody reports that £7000 has been remitted and briefs the new Lord Digby on the state of Ireland during the War of Independence: 'Ireland continues in a disturbed and unsatisfactory condition. This neighbourhood has not escaped the general destruction of Constabulary barracks, the only three barracks on your estate having been maliciously and wantonly burnt and wrecked, those of Clonmore being wholly destroyed and of Geashill & Killeigh partially so. The police authorities having vacated them prior to their destruction have since surrendered same, with a consequent loss of future rental. Claims for compensation have been lodged for substantial amounts and are still pending.'

Goodbody, Lewis

Administration

Contains lists of Irish Guards noting their name, regiment number, rank and where interned, including a separate listing of those from Birr; letters from Selfridge's & Co., Oxford St, London to Lois, Countess of Rosse, in relation to the contents of nine parcel types assembled for sending to the Irish Guards Prisoners of War; correspondence from Mary Britton, Rosfaraghan, Ferbane and Col. Douglas Proby, in relation to subscriptions collected in her village on behalf of Private B. Anderson (Reg No 3220), who is interned in Limburg; and correspondence between Major de Vesci, Regimental Adjutant, Irish Guards to Lady Rosse, mainly in relation to the movement of Irish Guards prisoners between POW camps in Germany so that parcels can be sent to them. Also includes ephemeral material such as newspaper cuttings relating to the Irish Guards, a packet of jam jar covers, and a copy of an illuminated address presented to Queen Mary from the Women of Ireland in July 1911, and distributed by Lady Aberdeen, the head of war relief in Ireland.

Annual Report 1882

Annual report, accounts and rental for year ending June 1882. Remarking on the 'extraordinary events in Ireland of the last 12 months', Digby reports that consequently there is a large amount of arrears, including abandoned arrears which are mainly the rents of Ballydownan and Roskeen farms which are in Lord Digby's hands having been surrendered.

Land improvements have ceased due to the suspension of rent and the generally disorganised state of the country, a new dwelling house for William Payne, Killeenmore being the chief expenditure. Thirty acres of young plantations in Derrygunnigan and Newtown woods and the maintenance of other young plantations accounted for expenditure in forestry.

Warns that the country is in a 'frightful crisis' and reports on the tactics of the Land League with their 'No Rent' manifesto (Autumn 1881), which was eagerly adopted and led to a complete suspension of the payment of rent. After an abatement was refused, tenantry on the Geashill Estate held a meeting in Killeigh in January 1882 at which a resolution was passed not to pay rent unless abatements were conceded. Proceedings were issued against nine of the principal agitators, their properties seized and put up for public auction in Tullamore. Digby reports that in seven cases, the tenants allowed him to be the purchaser, and in the other two cases, the tenants bought in their farms for the full amount of rent claimed and costs. Evictions followed, five of which required the aid of 'a large force of military and police and bailiffs supplied by the Property Defence Association.'

Annual Report 1883

Annual report, accounts and rental for year ending June 1883, describing a considerable improvement in the financial situation with a large drop in arrears outstanding due to the Arrears Act of 1882. Reports that abandoned and boycotted farms now account for 850 statute acres of land in Lord Digby's hands set for temporary grazing and necessitating the purchase of cattle. Also reports that despite a decrease in the net rental due to the action of the Land Commission Courts and voluntary reduction of rents, it was possible to remit profits of £11,500. No land improvements or works were carried out, but 50 acres of replanting was carried out at Derrygunnigan Wood, River Wood at Clonad and Derrygolan.

Describes a general improvement in the condition of the estate and attributes the cessation of agitation to the Prevention of Crimes Act brought in following the Phoenix Park murders in spring 1882.

Annual Report 1886

Annual report, accounts and rental for year ending June 1886, showing a further reduction in the gross rental received by £152.13.0 and noting a considerable increase in arrears outstanding mainly attributable to the continued and intensified depression in the value of almost all kind of stock and farm produce, recent proposed legislation and a renewed demand for alteration of land laws. Forestry works consisted of 20 acres planted in Derryclure Wood and Scrubb Wood.

Describes a further agitation at the winter collection of rents (1885) with the object of procuring an abatement of rents that have been recently judicially fixed. Also describes the 'great excitement' among the tenantry derived from the Home Rule movement and the Parnellite party.

Page fifteen.

Letter from Patrick J. Smyth to Abraham Stritch Fuller at Woodfield, Clara, County Offaly, on 15 April 1848, concerning the arrest of William Smith O'Brien, Thomas F. Meagher and John Mitchel for sedition. Informs Fuller that his subscription to the cause will be published in 'The Nation' and the 'United Irishman', and is glad to here that the neighbourhood of Clara is prepared for [rebellion]. Also includes a newspaper clipping concerning a minor "Accident to the Reverend Abraham Fuller".

Annual Report 1887

Annual report, accounts and rental for year ending June 1887, showing a small decrease in rent, a moderate increase in arrears which Digby blames on a 'grave agricultural depression'. Abandoned arrears are high with much of this land consisting of boycotted farms and lands now 'on hand' following surrender. Principal amounts of expenditure is for forestry at Scrubb Wood and Derryadd, which he points out led to a large amount of employment in the reach of small tenants and labourers on the estate who must otherwise have suffered from enforced idleness. Describes a 'half-hearted' agitation against the payment of any more rent than the National League authorities advised. Also notes that meetings were held before the winter collection of rents and a proposal to inaugurate the League's 'Plan of Campaign' was not successful.

Memoir 'Tullamore'

Memoir by Aloysius O'Brennan recounting the Tullamore Incident of 20 March1916 and the subsequent charges brought against 12 men in relation to the incident.

Diaries 1918-1925

  • IE OCL P131/2/3/3/2
  • File
  • January 1917-December 1912
  • Part of Loughton Papers

File of diaries belonging to Theodora Trench.

From 1917 until 1919 Theodora volunteered as Chauffeuse with the Red Cross's Voluntary Aid Detachment. Throughout the early diaries she writes about her experiences resulting from this volunteer work and the responsibilities she was required to carry out. Examples of such entries include one she wrote on 18 January 1918 she writes 'Evacuation 4.45 am breakfast 4.15. Cleaned engine a little. 1.30 went to Richmond football match & Austin lunchtime.' Another example includes an entry from 12 January 1919 'On duty all day (night duty) inspection 11.30'.
Theodora also uses the diaries to record her her daily life. On 5 February 1921 she records attending a concert, 'Concert Albert Hall (Samson & Delilah)' and on 23 may 1922 she writes about going to the Chelsea Flower show 'S & I went to Chelsea Flower Show. Very hot & [humid] but beautiful flowers...'.

Annual Report 1910

Annual report, accounts and rental for year ending June 1910, in which Digby reports that rents payable by tenant purchasers to the Land Commission have been satisfactorily met with only one defaulter, and that the rents of those who refused to sign purchase agreements have also been paid punctually. Also notes that the grasslands which have for several years been in Lord Digby's occupation have been let at satisfactory rents to solvent and respectable tenants and reports that there were none of the difficulties 'which have recently attended the letting of grasslands in so many parts of this county and in Ireland generally.'

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