Offaly (King's)

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Offaly (King's)

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Offaly (King's)

22 Descrição arquivística resultados para Offaly (King's)

Title Page

The border of the title page contains illustrations of the prize cottages at Killeigh and a map of the drainage plan at Ballyknockan. Also includes representations of the two gold medals awarded to Lord Digby by the Royal Agricultural Society of Ireland, the Challenge Cup awarded for best housing and the Challenge Cup awarded for best drainage.

Annual Report 1881

Annual report, accounts and rental for year ending June 1881. Reports that the financial condition of the estate had disimproved, outstanding arrears remaining due and abandoned arrears considerably increased. Profit remitted was £8500, a decrease on previous years, although there was a net increase in the overall rental income. Also reports that the Roskeen lease was surrendered by the reps of Mr. Bailey, and that the farm at Ballydownan was surrendered by Mr Adams and now in Lord Digby's hands and set for grazing with newly purchased cattle.

In terms of land improvement, Digby reports on the completion of a number of Board of Works projects including the draining and squaring of the moors under Scrubb Wood, the deepening of the boundary stream at Cappancur and the sinking of a large main drain in Balinvally bog. Construction works included new offices for Mr Arthur of Killurin and Patrick Nugent of Ballycollin; new cottages completed at Killeigh; new cottage commenced in Geashill Village and assistance give to William Mathews to erect substantial new dwelling house in Killurin. Also reports on the thinning and replanting of Derrygunnigan Wood.

Warns that agrarian agitation is increasing encouraged by the Land League. Blames the Government for slow response to agitation. Reports on a 'monster meeting' held in Tullamore by the Land League prior to the winter collection of rents (1880) where the Geashill tenantry requested en masse Griffith's Valuation as a fair rent which was subsequently refused by Lord Digby, but who abated the rent by 10% on the half year's rent payable. Identifies William Adams as the leader of the agitation and describes the court proceedings taken against him individually. With the result of being faced with bankruptcy, Adams paid his rent and then surrendered farm at Ballydownan, with the result that all other agitation on the estate ceased and rents were collected within three weeks. Also refers to 'boycotting' occurring throughout the estate but that no acts of violence or outrages took place. A further attempt at withholding rent in May 1881 was similarly short-lived.

Annual Report 1859

Annual report for year ending July 1859, including a list of leasholders and undertenants who have surrendered their several leases; general account of income and expenditure; detailed statements of disbursements including costs of drainage and building improvements; a list for compensation for surrender of tenancies and emigration; and a detailed rental of entire estate.

Contains a summary report outlining the mechanism of the leaseholder's compensation fund, the distribution of which, W. S. Trench describes as 'the most arduous and most serious task of responsibility I have ever had to encounter.' Also discusses estate improvements such as the drainage of 125 statute acres, particularly in Meelaghans where 100 acres 'of miserable cut away bog' was drained and cultivated. Also discusses improvements to the labourers' cottages through the additions of chimneys and windows and a proposal to enter the new cottages for the award of the Gold Medal offered by the Royal Agricultural Society. Further estate improvements include new roads through Killellery, Lugmore and Meelaghans.

Agrarian unrest is also discussed in the context of the case of Henry Kane, tenant, who along with his brother, Michael Kane, each held a farm in Killurin. On the death of Michael, Henry took immediate posssession of his brother's farm, to which the Trenchs objected. Report discusses general tenant support for Kane, even from outside the estate, and includes descriptions of intimidatory tactics by Ribbonmen. Also discusses measures to have Henry Kane ejected from the land altogether.

Drawings in the report include:
Page 2: 'Ancient pan found on Geashill Estate, 4 feet broad x 14 inches deep' (The Geashill Cauldron)
Page 11: 'Ancient keg of butter found 12ft below surface of Red Bog. 2 feet long x 13 inches broad.'

Annual Report 1863

Annual report for year ending June 1863 containing details of rental and general management of the estate. Includes a general report describing the failure of the 1862 harvest and the subsequent loss of rental income, including the complete abandonment of arrears in many cases. Regrets that funds were not sufficient to entice tenants to emigrate as many small and middle farmers were 'compelled to stay half starving on their land, unable to pay rent or crop the ground, or to emigrate to another land, and barely able to support life on the miserable produce of the soil'.

Also discusses the completion of drainage works at Meelaghans, now let to Mr Goodbody of Tullamore, and at Ballyknockan, now let to Mr. Ridgeway. Referring to building works, the main project was the building of the new school house at Geashill. Other new buildings include the Castle offices to replace those previously burnt. Reports on the new forester, Daniel Dewer, who has had success in making the woods and plantations profitable, in particular at Clonad.

Annual Report 1866

Annual report and rental for year end June 1866, containing reports on the steady and continuous improvement of the financial affairs of the estate. Also discusses drainage and land improvements particularly the 343 statute acres on either side of the Tullamore Road, and a new project at Ballyknockan flat. Reports that the soil here was particularly poor, and 650 tons of Dublin dairy manure was shipped down the Grand Canal and spread over the land, resulting in a marked improvement in grass growth. Also reports on the completion of the Killeigh main-drain and the Plovers-egg drain at Clonad Wood. Also includes a report on large-scale farming on the estate and the construction of three new farmhouses and a new forge.

On political matters, the report describes the 1865 general election which was contested by Sir Patrick O'Brien, John Gilbert King and Mr. Hennessy (O'Brien and King elected). Provides a detailed breakdown of voting preferences by the tenantry of Geashill Estate, who Trench reports, voted and returned home peacefully 'before the usual excitement attendant on an Irish Election had begun.' Also includes a description of election day in Tullamore, complete with mobs with 'shillelaghs'.

Annual Report 1867

Annual report and rental for year end June 1867, containing reports on the continuously improving financial situation of the estate, due mainly to the increase in rental receipts. Also reports on drainage at Ballyknockan and the remarkable effect of Dublin dairy manure has had on the land in this area. Other farming improvements include the invention and introduction by Trench of a new drainage plough which was given special merit by the Royal Agricultural Society of Ireland. Further farm machinery was also purchased such as a mowing machine and a hay-tedder which were hired out by the farmers of the estate.

Reports that building and slating has increased all over the estate and provides a description of various building repairs and a newly-built farmhouse let to the Commons family - 'one of the oldest and most respectable families on the estate.' Also reports that four new labourers' cottages built in Killeigh for people whose houses were in ruins, were awarded the Gold Medal and Challenge Cup by the Royal Agricultural Society of Ireland. Also refers to the sale of timber to the Great Southern & Western Railway, which allowed for a large portion of Derryclure to be thinned of beech and replanted with larch and oak, and also necessitated the purchase of a weighing machine for timber to avoid the tolls of the weighbridge in Tullamore.

Referring to past agrarian outrages, Trench remarks that the tone on the estate is 'excellent' and 'it is as if Fenianism never existed'.

Annual Report 1882

Annual report, accounts and rental for year ending June 1882. Remarking on the 'extraordinary events in Ireland of the last 12 months', Digby reports that consequently there is a large amount of arrears, including abandoned arrears which are mainly the rents of Ballydownan and Roskeen farms which are in Lord Digby's hands having been surrendered.

Land improvements have ceased due to the suspension of rent and the generally disorganised state of the country, a new dwelling house for William Payne, Killeenmore being the chief expenditure. Thirty acres of young plantations in Derrygunnigan and Newtown woods and the maintenance of other young plantations accounted for expenditure in forestry.

Warns that the country is in a 'frightful crisis' and reports on the tactics of the Land League with their 'No Rent' manifesto (Autumn 1881), which was eagerly adopted and led to a complete suspension of the payment of rent. After an abatement was refused, tenantry on the Geashill Estate held a meeting in Killeigh in January 1882 at which a resolution was passed not to pay rent unless abatements were conceded. Proceedings were issued against nine of the principal agitators, their properties seized and put up for public auction in Tullamore. Digby reports that in seven cases, the tenants allowed him to be the purchaser, and in the other two cases, the tenants bought in their farms for the full amount of rent claimed and costs. Evictions followed, five of which required the aid of 'a large force of military and police and bailiffs supplied by the Property Defence Association.'

Annual Report 1877

Annual report, accounts and rental for year ending June 1877, reporting no outstanding arrears with all rents paid punctually and not a single farm surrendered despite a bad harvest. Increased profit of £10,000 remitted to Lord Digby attributable to extra rents from the glebe lands of Killeigh and Geashill. Expenditure on drainage continued with works at Ballydownan bog and the thorough cleaning of the watercourse on the estate boundary between Cappancur and the late McMullen's bog at Ballydaly. Digby reports that the only centenarian tenant on the estate had been forced to sleep on his kitchen table due to the repeated flooding of his cabin in this area. A new drain was also sunk near Ballycommon canal bridge through the valley behind Ballinagar.

Construction works consisted of a new cattle shed for Darby Kelly, 'an improving tenant' in Cloncoher; new labourer's cottages at the Meelaghans; new cattle shed for Mr Davis, tenant of the reclaimed Meelaghans lands; a new dwelling house for J. Smollen of the Meelaghans; and the raising and repairing of the smith's house in Killeigh. Eighteen acres of the River Wood at Clonad was thoroughly drained and replanted with larch and oak.

Overall Digby reports that the estate is quiet and free from the disturbances and outrages perpetrated in other parts of the county.

Annual Report 1878

Annual report, accounts and rental for year ending June 1878, containing a less favourable financial report than previous years due to non-payment of rent as a result of a second consecutive bad harvest. Reports that he had to evict Samuel Johnston in Killurin due to the neglect of his farm. Details significant drainage works around the estate: main drainage at Killurin and Ross with permission of Mr. Briscoe who will contribute to the works of the drain through his property at Ross; main drainage at Knockballyboy which involves the sinking of the millstream forming the boundary of the Digby, Charleville and Ponsonby Estates at Clonad and Townparks, and jointly paid for; and further drainage for Michael Casey's holding at Killeenmore.

Expenditure also included a 'heavy outlay' for the large reclaimed farm at Annagharvey, where the tenant Mr Riddell had to surrender and was replaced by Thomas Cobbe who had new concrete farm buildings erected with galvanised corrugated iron roofs. Other construction works included a new dwelling house at the Meelaghans to attract a teacher for the Meelaghans National School; a new residence at Killeigh to replace decaying accommodation of John Warren; and substantial farm offices constructed for Mrs. Owens at the Meelaghans to house cattle. A significant amount was also expended on forestry clearances and replantation at Derrygolan and Hawkswood.

Annual Report 1879

Annual report, accounts and rental for year ending June 1879, containing a less favourable report than previous hears due to 'the great and general depression of trade and agriculture' and warns that another bad season will render the tenants in a precarious position. Reports that abandoned arrears had increased but that despite this the rental of the estate had increased and that a profit of £10000 had been remitted as usual. The estate was free of agitation, rents 'cheerfully paid' and only the 'thoroughly negligent' tenants affected by the depression.

Drainage works continued at Killurin and through Mr. Briscoe's property at Ross and there were further drainage works at Dalgan. The main expenditure on construction was for new farm buildings for Thomas Cobbe at Annagharvey, 'which are now the most substantial and commodious farm buildings on the estate.' Other works included a new dwelling house for Mrs Hoyland of Colehill; new outbuildings for farmer Thomas Foran at Killarles and a new slate roof for the priest's offices in Geashill.

Reports that the timber market is in a most depressed state. Forestry works included nearly 30 acres of clearances at Graigue Wood, Derrybrien Wood and Derryclure Wood, all of which were replanted.

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